Call for Inclusiveness May Not Work for Middle East’s Sectarian Divide

Call for Inclusiveness May Not Work for Middle East’s Sectarian Divide. YaleGlobal. Dilip Hiro. June 18, 2014.

ISIS, the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, also known as the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, began as an Al Qaeda offshoot in Iraq and is described as more fanatical than the parent group. With up to 5000 troops, ISIS controls an area of Syria and now storms through northern Iraq exploiting power vacuums and frustrations over minority rights. The group imposes a rigid Sunni interpretation of Islam that could unleash sectarian war across the region, explains author Dilip Hiro. Hiro reviews the history of Shia and Sunni influences over governance and warns that the centuries-old religious divide will continue to test the patience of western democracies who quarrel over how to intervene. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

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