Mapping Working Family Tax Credits and Their Anti-Poverty Impact

Mapping Working Family Tax Credits and Their Anti-Poverty Impact. Brookings Institution. Elizabeth Kneebone and Cecile Murray. February 21, 2017

Now that tax filing season is well under way, millions of Americans are about to begin receiving refunds. For many low-income taxpayers, two key tax code provisions—the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and the Additional Child Tax Credit (ACTC)—will keep them and their families from falling into poverty.

What makes the EITC and ACTC special is that they are refundable—that is, after offsetting taxes owed, filers receive the remainder of the credit in their refunds. As a result, the tax credits effectively boost the take-home pay of low- and moderate-income working families. According to the U.S. Census Bureau’s Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM)—a more nuanced measure of poverty that accounts for things like tax payments, work expenses, and in-kind benefits not reflected in the official measure—these tax credits lowered the national poverty rate by 3 percentage points in 2015, equivalent to lifting 9.2 million people above the poverty line. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[HTML format, various paging].

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s