Civic Engagement: How Can Digital Technology Encourage Greater Engagement in Civil Society?

Civic Engagement: How Can Digital Technology Encourage Greater Engagement in Civil Society? RAND Corporation. Talitha Dubow, Axelle Devaux, Catriona Manville. August 7, 2017.

This Perspective explores the potential impacts that digital technologies may have on the nature of civic engagement and political processes, providing an overview of the ways in which digital platforms and tools may contribute to strengthening a more inclusive civil society, and highlighting the significant risks posed by the use of these technologies. The authors argue that these risks must be properly understood and addressed if democratic society is to benefit from continuing innovation in this space. This Perspective is part of a series of four exploring the opportunities and challenges that digital technologies are creating within society ahead of the 2017 Thought Leadership programme at St George’s House, Windsor which has been designed and delivered by RAND Europe in conjunction with the Corsham Institute. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 11 pages, 133.31 KB].

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The Closing of the Jobs Gap: A Decade of Recession and Recovery

The Closing of the Jobs Gap: A Decade of Recession and Recovery. Brookings Institution. Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach et al. August 4, 2017

The Great Recession caused labor market devastation on a scale not seen for many decades. Millions of jobs were lost in the United States during 2008 and 2009, leaving the labor market with a hard road to recovery. Indeed, that recovery has required many years of job growth, and it was only in April 2014 that total employment reached its pre-recession level.

However, this milestone did not mark a return to pre-recession labor market conditions. Because the U.S. population is growing, simply reaching the previous number of jobs is not sufficient to return to pre-recession employment rates. At the same time, more baby boomers have entered retirement, somewhat offsetting the effects of population growth and reducing the number of jobs needed for a full economic recovery. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 13 pages, 1.68 MB].

Making Victory Count After Defeating ISIS: Stabilization Challenges in Mosul and Beyond

Making Victory Count After Defeating ISIS: Stabilization Challenges in Mosul and Beyond. RAND Corporation. Shelly Culbertson, Linda Robinson. July 24, 2017.

This report investigates humanitarian and stabilization needs in Iraq, through a case study of Mosul, and offers recommendations for immediate actions for stabilization after military operations to liberate it from ISIS. The study is based on data collection and review; visits to Iraq; and more than 50 in-depth interviews with a range of key senior officials. The research team examined humanitarian needs, security implications, infrastructure and services, and governance and reconciliation. All of these activities will affect the immediate stabilization of Mosul, and Iraq more broadly, including whether civilians can return home. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 99 pages, 2.53 MB].

Chronic Absenteeism: An Old Problem in Search of New Answers

Chronic Absenteeism: An Old Problem in Search of New Answers. Brookings Institution. Brian A. Jacob and Kelly Lovett. July 27, 2017

A recent report by the U.S. Department of Education identifies “chronic absenteeism” as a hidden educational crisis. In 2013-14, roughly 14 percent of students nationwide were chronically absent—defined as missing 10 percent or more of school days, excused or unexcused, which in most states would correspond to about 18 days of school missed each year. In some cities, that rate is considerably higher, with Detroit topping the list at 57.3 percent of students chronically absent. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[HTML format, various paging].

How Americans Perceive the Workplace: Results from the American Working Conditions Survey

How Americans Perceive the Workplace: Results from the American Working Conditions Survey. RAND Corporation. Nicole Maestas et al. August 14, 2017.

For many Americans, the workplace is hectic, hazardous, and physically demanding — yet many retirees would still consider rejoining the workforce if the right opportunity came along.
Those are just a few of the results from the American Working Conditions Survey — one of the most in-depth surveys ever undertaken about the American workplace. This brief presents highlights from the survey, conducted by investigators from Harvard University, the RAND Corporation, and the University of California, Los Angeles.
(Half of American workers say that they work in their free time to meet workplace demands, 63 percent feel that they are doing useful work, and 46 percent of retirees age 50 and older say that they would return to work if conditions were right.) [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 8 pages, 1.52 MB].

Globally, People Point to ISIS and Climate Change as Leading Security Threats: Concern About Cyberattacks, World Economy Also Widespread

Globally, People Point to ISIS and Climate Change as Leading Security Threats: Concern About Cyberattacks, World Economy Also Widespread. Pew Research Center. Jacob Poushter and Dorothy Manevich. August 1, 2017.

People around the globe identify ISIS and climate change as the leading threats to national security, according to a new Pew Research Center survey. The survey asked about eight possible threats. While the level and focus of concern varies by region and country, ISIS and climate change clearly emerge as the most frequently cited security risks across the 38 countries polled. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 32 pages, 1.29 MB].

Sustaining Progress in International Negotiations on Cybersecurity

Sustaining Progress in International Negotiations on Cybersecurity. Center for Strategic & International Studies. James Andrew Lewis. July 25, 2017

Concern over the risk of cyber attack led Russia in 1998 to propose at the United Nations a treaty to limit the use of cyber attack and cyber weapons. The Russian proposal drew on the experience of arms control and disarmament, but it found little support and was opposed by the United States. During the same period, there were also various proposals from the academic community for some sort of formal international cybersecurity convention, but many of these proposals were impractical and they too garnered little support. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 7 pages, 268.20 KB].