Confronting the Global Forced Migration Crisis: A Report of the CSIS Task Force on the Global Forced Migration Crisis

Confronting the Global Forced Migration Crisis: A Report of the CSIS Task Force on the Global Forced Migration Crisis. Center for Strategic & International Studies. Daniel F. Runde et al. May 29, 2018

 The size and scope of the global forced migration crisis are unprecedented. Almost 66 million people worldwide have been forced from home by conflict. If recent trends continue, this figure could increase to between 180 and 320 million people by 2030. This global crisis already poses serious challenges to economic growth and risks to stability and national security, as well as an enormous human toll affecting tens of millions of people. These issues are on track to get worse; without significant course correction soon, the forced migration issues confronted today will seem simple decades from now. Yet, efforts to confront the crisis continue to be reactive in addressing these and other core issues. The United States should broaden the scope of its efforts beyond the tactical and reactive to see the world through a more strategic lens colored by the challenges posed—and opportunities created—by the forced migration crisis at home and abroad. CSIS convened a diverse task force in 2017 to study the global forced migration crisis. This report is a result of those findings. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

 [PDF format, 67 pages].

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Social Innovation for Refugee Inclusion Conference Report: Maintaining Momentum and Creating Lasting Change

Social Innovation for Refugee Inclusion Conference Report: Maintaining Momentum and Creating Lasting Change. Migration Policy Institute. Liam Patuzzi and Alexandra Embirico. May 2018.

 Fostering the social and economic inclusion of refugees has long been the domain of governments and NGOs. In the wake of the 2015–16 European migration and refugee crisis, however, new actors have emerged and taken on important roles in integrating newcomers. This report describes key discussions and takeaways from an MPI Europe conference on these developments. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

 [PDF format, 22 pages].

Reconsidering Americans’ Overestimates of Government Waste and Foreign Aid

Reconsidering Americans’ Overestimates of Government Waste and Foreign Aid. Urban Institute. Vanessa Williamson. March 30, 2018

 Widespread and profound public misinformation about government presents a serious challenge to democratic accountability. This paper demonstrates that two of the most common examples of public misperception may be systematically overestimated; public misperceptions of “foreign aid” spending and “government waste” are in substantial part explained by differences of elite and popular terminology. Failure to take into account what members of the public mean by waste and foreign aid has led researchers, journalists and public officials to misunderstand meaningful public critiques of U.S. policy. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

 [PDF format, 4 pages].

Responding to the ECEC Needs of Children of Refugees and Asylum Seekers in Europe and North America

Responding to the ECEC Needs of Children of Refugees and Asylum Seekers in Europe and North America. Migration Policy Institute. Maki Park, Caitlin Katsiaficas, and Margie McHugh. April 2018.

 With many young children among the refugees and asylum seekers arriving in Europe and North America in recent years, policymakers and service providers are grappling with the task of designing and scaling up critical early childhood services. This report examines the approaches taken in nine key host countries, highlighting common challenges and promising practices. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

 [PDF format, 70 pages].

Deterring Emigration with Foreign Aid: An Overview of Evidence from Low-Income Countries

Deterring Emigration with Foreign Aid: An Overview of Evidence from Low-Income Countries. Center for Global Development.  Michael Clemens and Hannah Postel. February 12, 2018

 In response to the recent migrant and refugee crisis, rich countries have redoubled policy efforts to deter future immigration from poor countries by addressing the “root causes” of migration. The authors review existing evidence on the extent and effectiveness of such efforts. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

 [PDF format, 30 pages].

Foreign aid 101: A Quick and Easy Guide to Understanding US Foreign Aid

Foreign aid 101: A Quick and Easy Guide to Understanding US Foreign Aid. Fourth edition. Oxfam International. October 2017.

Foreign aid contributes to global poverty reduction, helps protect basic rights and liberties, and benefits America’s interests – all for less than one percent of the US federal budget. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 24 pages, 6.75 MB].

Engaging Communities in Refugee Protection: The Potential of Private Sponsorship in Europe

Engaging Communities in Refugee Protection: The Potential of Private Sponsorship in Europe. Migration Policy Institute. Susan Fratzke. September 2017.

This policy brief explores the broad spectrum of approaches to refugee settlement that include elements of community-based or private sponsorship—from the large and well-established Canadian program to smaller-scale and ad hoc initiatives in Europe. While these approaches vary widely in scope and the types of responsibilities sponsors take on, the author finds that governments and their civil-society partners generally face three common challenges when implementing them: balancing thorough program design with pressure to act quickly, providing government oversight and support without displacing willing community leaders, and cultivating strong working relationships between all parties involved. When done well, however, such programs hold the potential to foster important relationships between refugees and their neighbors and to improve integration outcomes in the long run. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 16 pages, 962.49 KB].