Trade Flows in the Age of Automation

Trade Flows in the Age of Automation.  Atlantic Council.  Jack Daly, Nick Brown. September 18, 2020

Innovative digital technologies will alter global value chains (GVCs) in the decade following COVID-19. As new technology re-shapes the nature of services trade, entire value chains will be disrupted. With trade in services growing 60 percent faster than that of goods, it is clear that the impact of new digital technologies will be widespread.  [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 42 pages].

Key Trends in the Global Economy through 2030

Key Trends in the Global Economy through 2030. Center for Strategic & International Studies. William Alan Reinsch et al. September 16, 2020

The CSIS Trade Commission on Affirming American Leadership was created in the summer of 2019 to develop a series of recommendations to cement U.S. global leadership in light of a multitude of twenty-first-century challenges, both at home and abroad. In a series of reports, the Commission lays out recommendations for the U.S. workforce, U.S. innovation policy, and U.S. engagement in the international trading system. This report, which is the first of four reports to be released from the Commission, sets the backdrop for those recommendations. For the U.S. to successfully lead in the next decade, we must first acknowledge the changes that are happening in the global economy and use that information to plan for U.S. leadership in a changing economic environment. This report outlines key trends in the global economy from now until 2030, including the rising importance of services and digital commerce, increased use of automation and AI in the workforce, a shift towards regional supply chains, and an aging workforce.   [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 36 pages].

International Cooperation Welcomed Across 14 Advanced Economies

International Cooperation Welcomed Across 14 Advanced Economies. Pew Research Center. James Bell et al. September 21, 2020

UN broadly credited with promoting peace and human rights as younger adults are more supportive of international cooperation

A Pew Research Center survey of 14,276 people across 14 countries conducted in summer 2020 finds that many believe greater global cooperation could have reduced the human toll from COVID-19. The same poll reveals strong support for taking the interests of other countries into account even if this requires compromise. These findings are in line with a pre-coronavirus 2019 Pew Research Center survey in 12 of the same 14 countries that showed robust public support for the idea of nations cooperating, rather than competing, on the world stage.   [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 49 pages].

Preparing the Workforce for 2030: A Pillar of Trade Leadership

Preparing the Workforce for 2030: A Pillar of Trade Leadership. Center for Strategic & International Studies. William Alan Reinsch et al. October 2, 2020

The CSIS Trade Commission on Affirming American Leadership was created in the summer of 2019 to develop a series of recommendations to cement U.S. global leadership in light of a multitude of twenty-first-century challenges, both at home and abroad. In a series of reports, the Commission lays out recommendations for the U.S. workforce, U.S. innovation policy, and U.S. engagement in the international trading system. This report, which is the second of four reports to be released from the commission, focuses on the U.S. workforce. This report recommends nine elements of a new approach to workforce development in the United States. Together, these recommendations would make the U.S. workforce more agile, adaptable, and competitive and put the United States in a position to pursue an am­bitious trade agenda. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 50 pages].

The Rule of Law and Sustainable Development

The Rule of Law and Sustainable Development. Center for Strategic & International Studies. James Michel. July 1, 2020

Rule of law is widely recognized as essential to governance and sustainable development but is complex to define. This new report examines how trends in development policy has shaped global support for the rule of law and explores how to enhance its impact on development. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 63 pages].

An Analysis of Education and Training Programs in Advanced Manufacturing Using Robotics

An Analysis of Education and Training Programs in Advanced Manufacturing Using Robotics. RAND Corporation. Megan Andrew et al. July 6, 2020.

In many factories today, robots are already working alongside human workers and have been doing so for some time. Analysts anticipate that this trend is likely to grow as industrial robots become increasingly sophisticated and advanced. At the same time, there likely will be a shortage of human workers who hold the necessary technical and nontechnical skills to work with, program, and repair their machine counterparts. Given this reality, it is critical that new workers and those who are in the process of retraining have access to effective and affordable training programs. But do we have enough quality programs to serve this need? And what factors constitute a “quality program”?
The RAND Corporation was asked to assess the state and future of education and training in advanced manufacturing (AM) using robotics, with a special focus on the U.S. Midwest region and the state of Pennsylvania — areas that currently are and historically have been hubs of manufacturing and provide important test cases for answering questions about the availability and content of AM training programs. The research team examines the economic context in which education, training, and workforce development programs currently operate and potentially will operate in the near future; reviews available programs and evaluates their curricular content and instructional practices and technologies; and reviews promising educational practices in these areas. The team also offers recommendations for stakeholders to consider as they work to meet the needs of the future AM workforce. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 33 pages].

A Global Strategy for Shaping the Post-COVID-19 World

A Global Strategy for Shaping the Post-COVID-19 World. Atlantic Council. Jeffrey Cimmino et al. July 7, 2020.

The COVID-19 pandemic is an acute public health and economic crisis that is further destabilizing an already weakened rules-based international system. With cooperation, determination, and resolve, however, the United States and its allies can recover from the crisis and revitalize an adapted rules-based system to bring about decades of future freedom, peace, and prosperity. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 60 pages].

The TAP-Plus Approach to Anti-Corruption in The Natural Resource Value Chain

The TAP-Plus Approach to Anti-Corruption in The Natural Resource Value Chain. Brookings Institution. Norman Eisen et al. June 28, 2020

Corruption is a massive global challenge, with the annual cost of bribery alone estimated at over $1.5 trillion. The social and economic consequences are even greater.

Corruption inhibits sustainable development and disproportionately harms vulnerable communities. It erodes public confidence and diverts public resources away from important services such as health, education, and infrastructure. One study estimates that if the wealth of the 94 (as of 2013) natural resource-dependent nations were used to pursue anti-poverty goals rather than corrupt or rent-seeking profits, more than half a billion people would be lifted out of extreme poverty by 2030.

Extractive industries like oil, gas, and mining are particularly prone to the corruption risks that undermine good governance. Given the complexity of these governance challenges, can natural resource corruption be reduced, or even eliminated?

In this introductory paper, we wrestle with these questions and try to find a better way forward. We introduce the Lever­aging Transparency to Reduce Corruption project (LTRC), a global initiative launched in 2017 by Brookings with support from Results for Development and the Natural Resource Governance Institute.

LTRC aims to develop best practices for reducing corruption along the natural resource value chain. LTRC’s approach is grounded in rigorous evidence and field work. This paper provides the initial basis for the LTRC project’s upcoming field studies. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 220 pages].

New Nature Economy Report Series

New Nature Economy Report Series. World Economic Forum. July 14, 2020.

A series of reports showing the relevance of nature loss to boardroom discussions on risks, opportunities and financing. These insights provide pathways for business to be part of the transition to a nature-positive economy. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 111 pages].

Economic Competition in the 21st Century

Economic Competition in the 21st Century. RAND Corporation. Howard J. Shatz. July 17, 2020.

U.S. foreign policy is built around a fundamental assumption that the United States faces growing competition politically, militarily, and economically. Economic competition in particular can be examined from a number of different perspectives grouped into two broad categories: The first is competition as outcome, or the ability to increase standards of living through domestic economic policies. The second is competition as action, where government policies and programs are applied to further not just economic but geopolitical and military goals.

Taking readers from the 1990s debates about competitiveness to more current outlooks on geopolitical competition using economic instruments, the author explains the different types of economic tools and actions countries use to compete and whether they more effectively serve to provide for domestic economic strength or to gain advantage in security and geopolitical areas. Along the way the author explores wide-ranging themes of national competitiveness, competition for markets and investment, geopolitical competition with economic tools, economic warfare, and competition over the nature of the global economic system.

After taking a broad look at forms of economic competition and competition using economics, the author shifts the discussion to why economic competition is relevant to the U.S. armed forces and, finally, what the policy implications are. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 78 pages].