Investing in Successful Summer Programs: A Review of Evidence Under the Every Student Succeeds Act

Investing in Successful Summer Programs: A Review of Evidence Under the Every Student Succeeds Act.  RAND Corporation.  Jennifer Sloan McCombs et al. June 5, 2019.

Research evidence suggests that summer breaks contribute to income-based achievement and opportunity gaps for children and youth. However, summertime can also be used to provide programs that support an array of goals for children and youth, including improved academic achievement, physical health, mental health, social and emotional well-being, the acquisition of skills, and the development of interests.

This report is intended to provide practitioners, policymakers, and funders current information about the effectiveness of summer programs designed for children and youth entering grades K–12. Policymakers increasingly expect that the creation of and investment in summer programs will be based on research evidence. Notably, the 2015 Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) directs schools and districts to adopt programs that are supported by research evidence if those programs are funded by specific federal streams. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 162 pages].

Advertisements

What Other States Can Learn from Louisiana’s Ambitious Efforts to Reshape Its Education System

What Other States Can Learn from Louisiana’s Ambitious Efforts to Reshape Its Education System. RAND Corporation.  Matthew D. Baird et al. June 11, 2019.

Historically, the state of Louisiana has earned low marks when it comes to K–12 academic achievement. Low kindergarten readiness rates, low national assessment scores, low college attainment rates, and high unemployment rates among high school graduates have defined the state’s education system for decades. Since 2012, however, the Louisiana Department of Education has taken bold strides toward making systemic shifts in the state’s education system. Some changes—such as restructuring the early childhood education system and graduation requirements for high school students—have been extensive. Others—such as changes to curricula for English language arts (ELA), mathematics, social studies, and science—have been structurally modest but have big implications for teaching and learning. Regardless of their scope and area of focus, all reforms have been designed with one goal in mind: to improve outcomes for all Louisiana public school students. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 8 pages].

Time for Change? Educators’ Perceptions of Discipline Reform in Their Schools

Time for Change? Educators’ Perceptions of Discipline Reform in Their Schools. RAND Corporation.  Rachel Perera, Courtney Armstrong. June 13, 2019.

Beginning in the late 1980s, policymakers concerned about violence in schools began to enact “zero-tolerance” policies in districts and states across the country. These policies mandated the use of exclusionary discipline for a range of behaviors, including such less serious offenses as classroom disruption and dress code violations. The efficacy of exclusionary discipline has been challenged, given persistent concerns that schools’ safety and discipline policies and practices do not create a safe and supportive learning environment for all students; empirical evidence demonstrating persistent disparities in school discipline; and the negative consequences of harsh discipline practices on a number of student, teacher, and school outcomes. Over the last few years, the state policy landscape has begun to dramatically shift away from exclusionary discipline in response to both local and federal pressure. This American Educator Panels Data Note provides insight into teachers’ and principals’ perceptions of the need for discipline reform in their schools. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 6 pages].

Registered Apprenticeship in Science and Engineering

Registered Apprenticeship in Science and Engineering. Urban Institute. Daniel Kuehn, Ian Hecker, Alphonse Simon. June 12, 2019

Workers with training in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) are in high demand in the United States and are essential to innovation and economic growth. Apprenticeship is a proven strategy for training workers, but it is underutilized in STEM occupations. This report explores employers’ experiences with STEM apprenticeship. STEM apprentices are concentrated in technician occupations that do not require a bachelor’s degree. They are better paid and have higher training completion rates than non-STEM apprentices. Nevertheless, employers often struggle with adapting the traditional apprenticeship model to information technology and engineering technology jobs that have do not have a history of using apprenticeship. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 47 pages].

Evaluation of North Carolina’s Pathways from Prison to Postsecondary Education Program

Evaluation of North Carolina’s Pathways from Prison to Postsecondary Education Program. RAND Corporation. Lois M. Davis, Michelle C. Tolbert. May 22, 2019

RAND researchers focus on North Carolina’s implementation of the Pathways from Prison to Postsecondary Education Project. They examine the in-prison and community components of the program and the experiences of Pathways students and staff. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 112 pages].

A Rising Share of Undergraduates Are From Poor Families, Especially at Less Selective Colleges

A Rising Share of Undergraduates Are From Poor Families, Especially at Less Selective Colleges. Pew Research Center. Richard Fry and Anthony Cilluffo. May 22, 2019.

The overall number of undergraduates at U.S. colleges and universities has increased dramatically over the past 20 years, with growth fueled almost exclusively by an influx of students from low-income families and students of color. But these changes are not occurring uniformly across the postsecondary landscape. The rise of poor and minority undergraduates has been most pronounced in public two-year colleges and the least selective four-year colleges and universities, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of National Center for Education Statistics data. There has been less change at the nation’s more selective four-year colleges and universities, where a majority of dependent undergraduates continue to be from middle- and higher-income families. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 18 pages].

Preparing the Future Workforce: Early Care and Education Participation among Children of Immigrants

Preparing the Future Workforce: Early Care and Education Participation among Children of Immigrants. Urban Institute. Erica Greenberg, Victoria Rosenboom, Gina Adams. March 22, 2019

Children of immigrants will make up a critical share of our nation’s future workforce, but they are less likely than other children to participate in early education programs known to support school readiness and long-term productivity. This study describes the characteristics and enrollment of children of immigrants using the most current and comprehensive dataset available: the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 2010–11. We find that children of immigrants tend to have fewer resources and greater need than children of US-born parents but lower rates of enrollment in center-based preschool. However, programs such as Head Start and state prekindergarten, as well as public kindergarten programs, are making progress in closing gaps in access. These findings suggest that current investments in early education are helping prepare the future workforce for success in 2050 and that expanded investments are warranted. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 38 pages].