Water Quality Targeting Success Stories: How to Achieve Measurably Cleaner Water Through U.S. Farm Conservation Watershed Projects

Water Quality Targeting Success Stories: How to Achieve Measurably Cleaner Water Through U.S. Farm Conservation Watershed Projects. World Resources Institute. Michelle Perez. May 2017

This joint report from WRI and the American Farmland Trust features lessons learned from six water quality targeting project success stories and highlights key factors that allowed these programs to achieve desirable environmental outcomes. It concludes with recommendations for both public and private sectors to help other projects achieve and measure landscape-scale environmental outcomes.
The report and its recommendations were developed based on literature reviews and interviews with USDA staff, farm conservation and water quality experts, and leaders of the six projects. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 162 pages, 10.26 MB].

U.S. Carbon Dioxide Emissions Trends and Projections: Role of the Clean Power Plan and Other Factors

U.S. Carbon Dioxide Emissions Trends and Projections: Role of the Clean Power Plan and Other Factors. Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress. Jonathan L. Ramseur. May 31, 2017

Recent international negotiations and domestic policy developments have generated interest in current and projected U.S. greenhouse gas (GHG) emission levels. GHG emissions are generated throughout the United States from millions of discrete sources. Of the GHG source categories, carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuel combustion account for the largest percentage (77%) of total U.S. GHG emissions. The electric power sector contributes the second largest percentage (35%) of CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion (one percentage point behind the transportation sector).

[PDF format, 18 pages, 861.04 KB].

Fact Sheet: Clean Energy Job Growth in the United States

Fact Sheet: Clean Energy Job Growth in the United States. World Resources Institute. Helen Mountford, Joel Jaeger. March 2017

The clean energy economy in the United States—including wind, solar, and efficiency industries—is putting more and more Americans to work. This fact sheet outlines the latest data on how many Americans are working in clean energy and where the jobs are located. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 2 pages, 223.21 KB].

Twelve Economic Facts on Energy and Climate Change

Twelve Economic Facts on Energy and Climate Change: A Joint Report from the Hamilton Project and the Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago. Brookings Institution. March 27, 2017

The United States is in the midst of an energy revolution. The North American shale boom has unlocked vast quantities of natural gas, upending domestic electricity markets and enabling rapidly growing export volumes. American shale oil has sent global oil prices to their lowest sustained level in a decade and slashed U.S. imports in half. Meanwhile, the cost of renewable fuels like wind and solar electricity has plummeted, and they now account for the majority of new electric generating capacity.

Given this technological and economic context, the United States has perhaps never been better positioned to tackle the urgent threat of climate change. Though it is often discussed as a future problem, climate change caused by greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is happening now. The concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere has increased from 317 parts per million in 1960 to more than 400 parts per million in 2016 (NOAA 2016), while the global average temperature has risen 1.6 degrees Fahrenheit (0.9° Celsius) above its 1960 level.

These changes are already impacting our everyday lives. Record-breaking temperatures, melting ice caps and more frequent coastal flooding, prolonged droughts, and damaging storms are just some of the intensifying risks we face as our planet continues to warm (IPCC 2007a). Despite these risks, the prices U.S. consumers pay for fossil fuels rarely reflect their costs, skewing consumption and investment choices away from cleaner fuels and discouraging the kinds of technological advancements that would allow the nation to make more efficient use of its energy resources. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 24 pages, 2.19 MB].

Future of the Funds: Exploring the Architecture of Multilateral Climate Finance

Future of the Funds: Exploring the Architecture of Multilateral Climate Finance. World Resources Institute. Niranjali Manel Amerasinghe et al. March 2017

Multilateral climate funds play a key role in using public finance to help drive the economic and societal transformation necessary to address climate change. There is growing pressure for policymakers to make the architecture of funds more effective and coherent. This report examines seven key multilateral climate funds and recommends operational and architectural reforms to improve their ability to deliver low-emissions and climate-resilient development. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 100 pages, 4.62 MB].

Delivering Real Change: Getting International Climate Finance to the Local Level

Delivering Real Change: Getting International Climate Finance to the Local Level. International Institute for Environment and Development. Marek Soanes et al. March 2017.

With the rapid ratification of the Paris Agreement, international climate funds will be important in scaling-up developing countries climate action. Evidence shows climate finance reaching the local level – as part of a coherent approach to climate action – delivers effective, efficient and sustainable results that enhance the impact of each dollar disbursed. This working paper explores the flows of climate finance within the main international climate funds, to understand how effective they are in getting finance to the local level and what design features enable or prevent local financing. It distils lessons from development funds that are experienced in local financing. It concludes by highlighting the ways in which local climate financing can be enhanced – to further improve the effectiveness of aid. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 48 pages, 884.24 KB].

Transport Emissions & Social Cost Assessment: Methodology Guide

Transport Emissions & Social Cost Assessment: Methodology Guide. World Resources Institute. Su Song. January 2017

The Transport Emissions & Social Cost Assessment is a project under the World Resources Institute’s Sustainable and Livable Cities Program, funded by the Caterpillar Foundation. The project aims to develop a methodology guide, with a simple MS Excel– based tool, to estimate transport emissions inventories and evaluate the associated social impact costs. The scope of the guide and tool covers six air pollutants (NOX, SOX, PM2.5, PM10, CO, and HC) and three GHGs (CO2, CH4, and N2O) for 18 types of transport modes at either the national or city level, specifically for the regions with limited data accessibility and weak data quality. With the methodology of social cost evaluation, the guide and tool can help with more cost-efficient policy-making. The MS Excel– based tool (Transport Emissions & Social Cost Assessment: TESCA version 1.0) is provided in a separate file. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[HTML format, various paging].