Confronting the Global Forced Migration Crisis: A Report of the CSIS Task Force on the Global Forced Migration Crisis

Confronting the Global Forced Migration Crisis: A Report of the CSIS Task Force on the Global Forced Migration Crisis. Center for Strategic & International Studies. Daniel F. Runde et al. May 29, 2018

 The size and scope of the global forced migration crisis are unprecedented. Almost 66 million people worldwide have been forced from home by conflict. If recent trends continue, this figure could increase to between 180 and 320 million people by 2030. This global crisis already poses serious challenges to economic growth and risks to stability and national security, as well as an enormous human toll affecting tens of millions of people. These issues are on track to get worse; without significant course correction soon, the forced migration issues confronted today will seem simple decades from now. Yet, efforts to confront the crisis continue to be reactive in addressing these and other core issues. The United States should broaden the scope of its efforts beyond the tactical and reactive to see the world through a more strategic lens colored by the challenges posed—and opportunities created—by the forced migration crisis at home and abroad. CSIS convened a diverse task force in 2017 to study the global forced migration crisis. This report is a result of those findings. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

 [PDF format, 67 pages].

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Social Innovation for Refugee Inclusion Conference Report: Maintaining Momentum and Creating Lasting Change

Social Innovation for Refugee Inclusion Conference Report: Maintaining Momentum and Creating Lasting Change. Migration Policy Institute. Liam Patuzzi and Alexandra Embirico. May 2018.

 Fostering the social and economic inclusion of refugees has long been the domain of governments and NGOs. In the wake of the 2015–16 European migration and refugee crisis, however, new actors have emerged and taken on important roles in integrating newcomers. This report describes key discussions and takeaways from an MPI Europe conference on these developments. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

 [PDF format, 22 pages].

Managing International Borders: Balancing Security with the Licit Flow of People and Goods

Managing International Borders: Balancing Security with the Licit Flow of People and Goods. RAND Corporation.  Daniel M. Gerstein et al. May 9, 2018.

 The concept of border management hinges on the tension between the need to prevent undesirable people and goods from crossing borders and the economic vitality that a country gains through trade and travel. Building on the concept of border management, this Perspective proposes opportunities to strengthen security while simultaneously improving the flow of licit travelers and goods through national policies, programs, regulations, and activities. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

 [PDF format, 31 pages].

Bringing Evidence to the Refugee Integration Debate

Bringing Evidence to the Refugee Integration Debate. Urban Institute. Hamutal Bernstein. April 9, 2018

 There is a major disconnect between the current policy debate and the reality of refugee outcomes in the US. After a tumultuous year of policy changes for the refugee resettlement program and as refugees are being framed as security, economic, and cultural threats, policymakers must consider the evidence base on the realities of refugees and their local communities.

Today’s policy debates are not grounded in the evidence that underscores how successful refugee integration has been and how refugees differ from other immigrants. To that end, this report provides context on resettled refugees and the policy conversation, synthesizes evidence on integration outcomes, and discusses the strengths and weaknesses of the data sources and methods on which researchers rely. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

 [PDF format, 38 pages].

Responding to the ECEC Needs of Children of Refugees and Asylum Seekers in Europe and North America

Responding to the ECEC Needs of Children of Refugees and Asylum Seekers in Europe and North America. Migration Policy Institute. Maki Park, Caitlin Katsiaficas, and Margie McHugh. April 2018.

 With many young children among the refugees and asylum seekers arriving in Europe and North America in recent years, policymakers and service providers are grappling with the task of designing and scaling up critical early childhood services. This report examines the approaches taken in nine key host countries, highlighting common challenges and promising practices. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

 [PDF format, 70 pages].

Key Facts about U.S. Immigration Policies and Proposed Changes

Key Facts about U.S. Immigration Policies and Proposed Changes. Pew Research Center.  Jens Manuel Krogstad and Ana Gonzalez-Barrera. February 26, 2018

 Nearly 34 million lawful immigrants live in the United States. Many live and work in the country after receiving lawful permanent residence (also known as a green card), while others receive temporary visas available to students and workers. In addition, roughly 1 million unauthorized immigrants have temporary permission to live and work in the U.S. through the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals and Temporary Protected Status programs.

For years, proposals have sought to shift the nation’s immigration system away from its current emphasis on family reunification and employment-based migration, and toward a points-based system that prioritizes the admission of immigrants with certain education and employment qualifications. These proposals have received renewed attention under the Trump administration. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

 [HTML format, various paging].

Deterring Emigration with Foreign Aid: An Overview of Evidence from Low-Income Countries

Deterring Emigration with Foreign Aid: An Overview of Evidence from Low-Income Countries. Center for Global Development.  Michael Clemens and Hannah Postel. February 12, 2018

 In response to the recent migrant and refugee crisis, rich countries have redoubled policy efforts to deter future immigration from poor countries by addressing the “root causes” of migration. The authors review existing evidence on the extent and effectiveness of such efforts. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

 [PDF format, 30 pages].