2016 Law Enforcement Use of Social Media Survey

2016 Law Enforcement Use of Social Media Survey: A Joint Publication by the International Association of Chiefs of Police and the Urban Institute. KiDeuk Kim, Ashlin Oglesby-Neal, Edward Mohr. March 3, 2017

A national scan of practice among law enforcement agencies across the United States reveals that they use social media to notify the public of safety concerns, manage public relations, and gather evidence for criminal investigations. The Urban Institute and the International Association of Chiefs of Police partnered to develop a comprehensive understanding of law enforcement’s use of social media. A total of 539 agencies representing 48 states participated in the survey and answered questions regarding their use of social media, the management of social media engagement activities, barriers to success, and their future social media needs. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 22 pages, 410.63 KB].

Dark Web

Dark Web. Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress. Kristin Finklea. March 10, 2017

The layers of the Internet go far beyond the surface content that many can easily access in their daily searches. The other content is that of the Deep Web, content that has not been indexed by traditional search engines such as Google. The furthest corners of the Deep Web, segments known as the Dark Web, contain content that has been intentionally concealed. The Dark Web may be used for legitimate purposes as well as to conceal criminal or otherwise malicious activities. It is the exploitation of the Dark Web for illegal practices that has garnered the interest of officials and policymakers.

[PDF format, 19 pages, 774.49 KB].

Future-Proofing Justice: Building a Research Agenda to Address the Effects of Technological Change on the Protection of Constitutional Rights

Future-Proofing Justice: Building a Research Agenda to Address the Effects of Technological Change on the Protection of Constitutional Rights. RAND Corporation. Brian A. Jackson et al. January 10, 2017.

New technologies have changed the types of data that are routinely collected about citizens on a daily basis. For example, smart devices collect location and communication data, and fitness trackers and medical devices capture physiological and other data. As technology changes, new portable and connected devices have the potential to gather even more information. Such data have great potential utility in criminal justice proceedings, and they are already being used in case preparations, plea negotiations, and trials. But the broad expansion of technological capability also has the potential to stress approaches for ensuring that individuals’ constitutional rights are protected through legal processes. In an effort to consider those implications, we convened a panel of criminal justice practitioners, legal scholars, and individuals from the civil liberties community to identify research and other needs to prepare the U.S. legal system both for technologies we are seeing today and for technologies we are likely to see in the future. Through structured brainstorming, the panel explored a wide range of potential issues regarding these technologies, from evidentiary and procedural concerns to questions about the technologies’ accuracy and efficient use. Via a Delphi-based prioritization of the results, the panel crafted a research agenda — including best practice and training development, evaluation, and fundamental research efforts — to provide the criminal justice community with the knowledge and capabilities needed to address these important and complex technological questions going forward. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 44 pages, 795.50 KB].

From Awareness to Action – A Cybersecurity Agenda for the 45th President

From Awareness to Action – A Cybersecurity Agenda for the 45th President. Center for Strategic & International Studies. Cyber Policy Task Force. January 4, 2017.

CSIS began work in late 2014 with leading experts to develop recommendations on cybersecurity for the next presidential administration. The CSIS Cyber Policy Task Force divided its work among two groups, one in Washington D.C. and the other in Silicon Valley. Each group brought a unique and powerful perspective to the problems of cybersecurity, and their efforts form the basis of our recommendations on policies, organizational improvements, and resources needed for progress in this challenging area. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 34 pages, 7.76 MB].

Social Media Update 2016

Social Media Update 2016. Pew Research Center. Shannon Greenwood, Andrew Perrin and Maeve Duggan. November 11, 2016.

Over the past decade, Pew Research Center has documented the wide variety of ways in which Americans use social media to seek out information and interact with others. A majority of Americans now say they get news via social media, and half of the public has turned to these sites to learn about the 2016 presidential election. Americans are using social media in the context of work (whether to take a mental break on the job or to seek out employment), while also engaging in an ongoing effort to navigate the complex privacy issues that these sites bring to the forefront. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 19 pages, 500.6 KB].

Recruiting and Retaining Cybersecurity Ninjas

Recruiting and Retaining Cybersecurity Ninjas. Center for Strategic & International Studies. Franklin S. Reeder and Katrina Timlin. October 19, 2016.

This report identifies the factors that make an organization the employer of choice for what the authors call “cybersecurity ninjas.” Much has been written about the shortage of cybersecurity professionals, but little work has been done on the factors that help high-performing cybersecurity organizations build and keep a critical mass of high-end specialists. This is a first attempt that the authors hope will prompt discussion and drive changes in how organizations attract and retain high-end cybersecurity talent. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 32 pages, 6.76 MB].

Digital Readiness Gaps

Digital Readiness Gaps. Pew Research Center. John B. Horrigan. September 20, 2016.

For many years concerns about “digital divides” centered primarily on whether people had access to digital technologies. Now, those worried about these issues also focus on the degree to which people succeed or struggle when they use technology to try to navigate their environments, solve problems, and make decisions. The report addresss digital readiness. The analysis explores the attitudes and behaviors that underpin people’s preparedness and comfort in using digital tools for learning as we measured it in a survey about people’s activities for personal learning. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 30 pages, 881.81 KB].