Results Not Receipts: Counting the Right Things in Aid and Corruption

Results Not Receipts: Counting the Right Things in Aid and Corruption. Center for Global Development. Charles Kenny. June 19, 2017.

Results Not Receipts explores how an important and justified focus on corruption is damaging the potential for aid to deliver results. Donors treat corruption as an issue they can measure and improve, and from which they can insulate their projects at acceptable costs by controlling processes and monitoring receipts. But our ability to measure corruption is limited, and the link between donors’ preferred measures and development outcomes is weak. Noting the costs of the standard anticorruption tools of fiduciary controls and centralized delivery, Results Not Receipts urges a different approach to tackling corruption in development: focus on outcomes. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 4 pages, 124.67 KB].

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Anti-Corruption Strategies in Foreign Aid: From Controls to Results

Anti-Corruption Strategies in Foreign Aid: From Controls to Results. Center for Global Development. William Savedoff. March 7, 2016.

Corruption is an obstacle to social and economic progress in developing countries yet we still know very little about the effectiveness of anti-corruption efforts and their impact on development impact. This essay looks at 25 years of efforts by foreign aid agencies to combat corruption and proposes a new strategy which could leverage existing approaches by directly incorporating information on development results. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 19 pages, 295.81 KB].

Crime and Corruption Top Problems in Emerging and Developing Countries

Crime and Corruption Top Problems in Emerging and Developing Countries. Pew Research Global Attitudes Project. November 6, 2014.

Crime and corruption, common scourges of modern societies, top the list of problems cited by publics in emerging and developing nations. A median of 83% of people across 34 emerging and developing economies say crime is a very big problem in their country, and 76% say the same about corrupt political leaders. Many also worry about issues such as health care, poor quality schools, water and air pollution, and food safety. Generally, electricity shortages and traffic are seen as less pressing issues. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 45 pages, 535.95 KB].

Countering Corruption: 2012 Conference Report from the World Forum on Governance

Countering Corruption: 2012 Conference Report from the World Forum on Governance. Brookings Institution. Stephen M. Davis et al. March 4, 2013.

Reformers, businesspeople, investors and citizens alike are grappling with a common issue around the world: Good governance. How can each nation secure government that is honest and not corrupt, that serves the public interest and not special interests, and that aims to deliver practical solutions to today’s most pressing problems? How can corporations and institutional investors achieve good governance of their own, that protects and promotes long term value while complying with legal norms, ethical standards and customer expectations? What is the relationship between good corporate and democratic governance? Indeed, is either possible without the other? [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 28 pages, 1.5 MB].