What Is the Impact of the CIA Report?

What Is the Impact of the CIA Report? Council on Foreign Relations. Karen J. Greenberg et al. December 12, 2014

The long-awaited Senate Intelligence Committee report on the CIA’s controversial detention and interrogation program has placed U.S. counterterrorism practices after 9/11 under renewed scrutiny. As the public debates and comes to terms with the findings, three experts, Karen J. Greenberg, Jack Devine, and Magnus Ranstorp, remark on the significance of the report and the legacy of these programs at home and abroad. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[HTML format, various paging].

U.S.-EU Cooperation Against Terrorism

U.S.-EU Cooperation Against Terrorism. Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress. Kristin Archick. December 1, 2014

The September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the United States and the subsequent revelation of Al Qaeda cells in Europe gave new momentum to European Union (EU) initiatives to combat terrorism and improve police, judicial, and intelligence cooperation among its member states. Other deadly incidents in Europe, such as the Madrid and London bombings in 2004 and 2005 respectively, injected further urgency into strengthening EU counterterrorism capabilities and reducing barriers among national law enforcement authorities so that information could be meaningfully shared and suspects apprehended expeditiously. Among other steps, the EU has established a common definition of terrorism and a common list of terrorist groups, an EU arrest warrant, enhanced tools to stem terrorist financing, and new measures to strengthen external EU border controls and improve transport security. Over the years, the EU has also encouraged
member states to devote resources to countering radicalization and terrorist recruitment, issues that have been receiving renewed attention in light of growing European concerns about the possible threats posed by European fighters returning from the conflicts in Syria and Iraq.

[PDF format, 33 pages, 398.66 KB].

Libya After Qaddafi: Lessons and Implications for the Future

Libya After Qaddafi: Lessons and Implications for the Future. RAND Corporation. Christopher S. Chivvis and Jeffrey Martini. March 17, 2014.

The international community’s limited approach to post-conflict stabilization of Libya has left the nation struggling and on the brink of civil war. The essential tasks of establishing security, building political and administrative institutions, and restarting the economy were left almost entirely up to Libya’s new leaders, according to the authors. No international forces were deployed to keep the peace, in contrast with NATO interventions in Bosnia, Kosovo, and Afghanistan. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

http://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/research_reports/RR500/RR577/RAND_RR577.sum.pdf Summary [PDF format, 10 pages, 0.1 MB].

http://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/research_reports/RR500/RR577/RAND_RR577.pdf Full Text [PDF format, 119 pages, 1.6 MB].

Countering Others’ Insurgencies: Understanding U.S. Small-Footprint Interventions in Local Context

Countering Others’ Insurgencies: Understanding U.S. Small-Footprint Interventions in Local Context. RAND Corporation. Stephen Watts et al. February 25, 2014.

The report describes counterinsurgency strategies and practices and conditions in which U.S. “small-footprint” partnerships may succeed. Successful U.S. operations have been concentrated in favorable conditions, but most insurgencies occur in worst-case conditions. Case studies of the Philippines and Pakistan reinforce findings of the analysis and highlight challenges for the U.S. in trying to influence partners. The authors provide recommendations are offered for managing troubled partnerships. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

http://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/research_reports/RR500/RR513/RAND_RR513.sum.pdf Summary [PDF format, 12 pages, 0.1 MB].

http://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/research_reports/RR500/RR513/RAND_RR513.pdf Full Text [PDF format, 254 pages, 1.3 MB].

Majority Views NSA Phone Tracking as Acceptable Anti-terror Tactic: Public Says Investigate Terrorism, Even If It Intrudes on Privacy

Majority Views NSA Phone Tracking as Acceptable Anti-terror Tactic: Public Says Investigate Terrorism, Even If It Intrudes on Privacy. Pew Research Center for the People & the Press. June 10, 2013.

A majority of Americans – 56% – say the National Security Agency’s (NSA) program tracking the telephone records of millions of Americans is an acceptable way for the government to investigate terrorism, though a substantial minority – 41% – say it is unacceptable. And while the public is more evenly divided over the government’s monitoring of email and other online activities to prevent possible terrorism, these views are largely unchanged since 2002, shortly after the 9/11 terrorist attacks. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 14 pages, 128.10 KB].

U.S.-EU Cooperation Against Terrorism

U.S.-EU Cooperation Against Terrorism. Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress. Kristin Archick. May 21, 2013.

U.S.-EU cooperation against terrorism has led to a new dynamic in U.S.-EU relations by fostering dialogue on law enforcement and homeland security issues previously reserved for bilateral discussions. Nevertheless, some challenges persist in fostering closer U.S.-EU cooperation in these fields. Among the most prominent are data privacy and data protection concerns. The EU considers the privacy of personal data a basic right and EU rules and regulations strive to keep personal data out of the hands of law enforcement as much as possible. The negotiation of several U.S.-EU information-sharing agreements, from those related to tracking terrorist financial data to sharing airline passenger information, has been complicated by ongoing EU concerns about whether the United States could guarantee a sufficient level of protection for European citizens’ personal data.

[PDF format, 27 pages, 319.14 KB].