Economic Impact of Cybercrime – No Slowing Down

Economic Impact of Cybercrime – No Slowing Down. Center for Strategic & International Studies. James Andrew Lewis. February 21, 2018

 The Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), in partnership with McAfee, present Economic Impact of Cybercrime – No Slowing Down, a global report that focuses on the significant impact that cybercrime has on economies worldwide. The report concludes that close to $600 billion, nearly one percent of global GDP, is lost to cybercrime each year, which is up from a 2014 study that put global losses at about $445 billion. The report attributes the growth over three years to cybercriminals quickly adopting new technologies and the ease of cybercrime growing as actors leverage black markets and digital currencies. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

 [PDF format, 28 pages].

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Rethinking Cybersecurity: Strategy, Mass Effect, and States

Rethinking Cybersecurity: Strategy, Mass Effect, and States. Center for Strategic & International Studies. James Andrew Lewis. January 9, 2018

 Despite all the attention, cyberspace is far from secure. Why this is so reflects conceptual weaknesses as much as imperfect technologies. Two questions highlight shortcomings in the discussion of cybersecurity. The first is why, after more than two decades, we have not seen anything like a cyber Pearl Harbor, cyber 9/11, or cyber catastrophe, despite constant warnings. The second is why, despite the increasing quantity of recommendations, there has been so little improvement, even when these recommendations are implemented. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

 [PDF format, 50 pages].

From Awareness to Action – A Cybersecurity Agenda for the 45th President

From Awareness to Action – A Cybersecurity Agenda for the 45th President. Center for Strategic & International Studies. Cyber Policy Task Force. January 4, 2017.

CSIS began work in late 2014 with leading experts to develop recommendations on cybersecurity for the next presidential administration. The CSIS Cyber Policy Task Force divided its work among two groups, one in Washington D.C. and the other in Silicon Valley. Each group brought a unique and powerful perspective to the problems of cybersecurity, and their efforts form the basis of our recommendations on policies, organizational improvements, and resources needed for progress in this challenging area. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 34 pages, 7.76 MB].

Recruiting and Retaining Cybersecurity Ninjas

Recruiting and Retaining Cybersecurity Ninjas. Center for Strategic & International Studies. Franklin S. Reeder and Katrina Timlin. October 19, 2016.

This report identifies the factors that make an organization the employer of choice for what the authors call “cybersecurity ninjas.” Much has been written about the shortage of cybersecurity professionals, but little work has been done on the factors that help high-performing cybersecurity organizations build and keep a critical mass of high-end specialists. This is a first attempt that the authors hope will prompt discussion and drive changes in how organizations attract and retain high-end cybersecurity talent. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 32 pages, 6.76 MB].

Distinguishing Acts of War in Cyberspace: Assessment Criteria, Policy Considerations, and Response Implications

Distinguishing Acts of War in Cyberspace: Assessment Criteria, Policy Considerations, and Response Implications. Strategic Studies Institute. Jeffrey L. Canton. October 16, 2014.

Currently, there is no internationally accepted definition of when hostile actions in cyberspace are recognized as attacks, let alone acts of war. Although many of the challenges associated with this conundrum are common with those of the traditional domains, land, sea, and air, how should senior policymakers and decisionmakers address the unique vexations related to the complex and dynamic character of conflict in the cyberspace domain? [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[HTML format with a link to the PDF file].

The Other Quiet Professionals: Lessons for Future Cyber Forces from the Evolution of Special Forces

The Other Quiet Professionals: Lessons for Future Cyber Forces from the Evolution of Special Forces. RAND Corporation. Christopher Paul et al. October 3, 2014.

A review of commonalities, similarities, and differences between the still-nascent U.S. cyber force and early U.S. special operations forces, conducted in 2010, offers salient lessons for the future direction of U.S. cyber forces. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF formtat, 84 pages, 713.90 KB].

Liberty, Equality, Connectivity: Transatlantic Cybersecurity Norms

Liberty, Equality, Connectivity: Transatlantic Cybersecurity Norms. Center for Strategic & International Studies. James Andrew Lewis. February 25, 2014.

According to Lewis, Europe and the United States have a collective interest in the promotion of a stable international order based on the rule of law, open and equitable arrangements for trade, and a commitment to democratic government and individual rights. These interests face renewed challenges in a complex global political environment.[Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 15 pages, 292.7 KB].