In Western Europe, Public Attitudes Toward News Media More Divided by Populist Views Than Left-Right Ideology

In Western Europe, Public Attitudes Toward News Media More Divided by Populist Views Than Left-Right Ideology. Pew Research Center.  Amy Mitchell et al. May 14, 2018.

 In Western Europe, public views of the news media are divided by populist leanings – more than left-right political positions – according to a new Pew Research Center public opinion survey conducted in Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom.

Across all eight countries, those who hold populist views value and trust the news media less, and they also give the media lower marks for coverage of major issues, such as immigration, the economy and crime. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

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Views on National Economies Mixed as Many Countries Continue to Struggle

Views on National Economies Mixed as Many Countries Continue to Struggle. Pew Research Center. Margaret Vice. August 9, 2016.

Almost a decade after the global financial crisis rattled national economies, many in the world feel their respective countries’ economies remain weak.The survey reveals a bleak picture in parts of Europe, with more than eight-in-ten in Greece, France and Spain describing their country’s economic situation as bad. This gloom is not shared by all in the European Union, however – most Swedes, Germans and Dutch say their economy is doing well. And in China, India and Australia, views are mostly positive. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 13 pages, 151.86 KB].

Improving Education for Migrant-Background Students: A Transatlantic Comparison of School Funding

Improving Education for Migrant-Background Students: A Transatlantic Comparison of School Funding. Migration Policy Institute. Julie Sugarman et al. June 2016.

The report focuses on four countries, Canada, France, Germany, and the United States, shedding light on supplementary funding mechanisms targeted to migrant-background students, and some of the key challenges and strategies decisionmakers are wrestling with as they attempt to ensure that additional resources are used effectively. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

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Financial Advice Markets: A Cross-Country Comparison

Financial Advice Markets: A Cross-Country Comparison. RAND Corporation. Jeremy Burke and Angela A. Hung. October 8, 2015.

Because many people are ill equipped to make complex financial decisions on their own, financial advisers can provide a valuable service in helping investors make such decisions. Given that conflicts of interest may influence advisers’ behavior in ways that may be detrimental to their clients’ interests, it is informative to examine how countries around the world have used regulation to try to improve the quality of financial advice, and how the regulatory tools used have affected their respective financial advice markets. The review compares the financial advice markets in the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia, Germany, Singapore, and the European Union, for a cross-section of countries that recently made regulatory changes aimed at improving financial advice. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 42 pages, 0.3 MB].

Family Support in Graying Societies

Family Support in Graying Societies. Pew Research Center. May 21, 2015.

The United States is turning gray, with the number of people ages 65 and older expected to nearly double by 2050. This major demographic transition has implications for the economy, government programs such as Social Security and families across the U.S. Among adults with at least one parent 65 or older, nearly three-in-ten already say that in the preceding 12 months they have helped their parents financially. Twice that share report assisting a parent with personal care or day-to-day tasks. Germany and Italy, two of the “oldest” nations in the world, after only Japan, are already where the U.S. will be in 2050: a fifth of the population in each country is age 65 or older. Compared with the U.S. today, a higher share of adults in Germany and Italy report helping their aging parents with basic tasks, and more in Italy have also provided personal care. However, in both countries, fewer adults than in the U.S. say they have provided financial assistance to their aging parents. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 59 pages, 1.12 MB].

Support in Principle for U.S.-EU Trade Pact: But Some Americans and Germans Wary of TTIP Details

Support in Principle for U.S.-EU Trade Pact: But Some Americans and Germans Wary of TTIP Details. Pew research Global Attitudes Project. April 9, 2014.

The European Union and the United States are negotiating the most economically significant regional free trade agreement in history: the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). Publics in Germany and the United States support TTIP and trade expansion in general, especially with each other. But when it comes to specifics, both Americans and Germans oppose many details of this far-reaching initiative. Moreover, they disagree with one another on making transatlantic regulatory standards similar. And, in the United States, there is a striking generation gap in attitudes relating to TTIP. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 25 pages, 551.09 KB].

The Future of Immigrant Integration in Europe: Mainstreaming Approaches for Inclusion

The Future of Immigrant Integration in Europe: Mainstreaming Approaches for Inclusion. Migration Policy Institute. Elizabeth Collett and Milica Petrovic. March 2014.

According to the report, a quiet policy transformation is taking place in Europe, as policymakers increasingly turn to a strategy of “mainstreaming” immigrant integration, seeking to reach people with a migration background through needs-based social programming and policies that also target the general population. The report assesses mainstreaming efforts across government in Denmark, France, Germany, and the United Kingdom. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

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