Confronting the Global Forced Migration Crisis: A Report of the CSIS Task Force on the Global Forced Migration Crisis

Confronting the Global Forced Migration Crisis: A Report of the CSIS Task Force on the Global Forced Migration Crisis. Center for Strategic & International Studies. Daniel F. Runde et al. May 29, 2018

 The size and scope of the global forced migration crisis are unprecedented. Almost 66 million people worldwide have been forced from home by conflict. If recent trends continue, this figure could increase to between 180 and 320 million people by 2030. This global crisis already poses serious challenges to economic growth and risks to stability and national security, as well as an enormous human toll affecting tens of millions of people. These issues are on track to get worse; without significant course correction soon, the forced migration issues confronted today will seem simple decades from now. Yet, efforts to confront the crisis continue to be reactive in addressing these and other core issues. The United States should broaden the scope of its efforts beyond the tactical and reactive to see the world through a more strategic lens colored by the challenges posed—and opportunities created—by the forced migration crisis at home and abroad. CSIS convened a diverse task force in 2017 to study the global forced migration crisis. This report is a result of those findings. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

 [PDF format, 67 pages].

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Fostering Effective Energy Transition

Fostering Effective Energy Transition. World Economic Forum. March 14, 2018.

 The first edition of the Fostering Effective Energy Transition report, prepared with analytical support from McKinsey & Company, is part of the World Economic Forum System Initiative on Shaping the Future of Energy. The report introduces the “Energy Transition Index”, which builds upon the previous series of “Global Energy Architecture Performance Index” by adding a forward looking element of country readiness for energy transition. The index benchmarks 114 countries on the current level of their energy system performance, and the readiness of their macro environment for transition to a secure, sustainable, affordable and inclusive future energy system. The fact-based framework and rankings are intended to enable policy makers and businesses to identify the destination for energy transition, identify imperatives, and align policy and market enablers accordingly. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

 [PDF format, 44 pages].

Populism or Transformative Movements?

Populism or Transformative Movements? YaleGlobal. Alphan Telek and Seren Selvin Korkmaz. March 1, 2018

 Progressive movements promising social, political and economic transformation are the antidote to the anger and fear associated with polarization and populism. The leaders of left-transformative movements pursue serious policymaking to reduce inequality while increasing opportunity and citizen participation, argue Seren Selvin Korkmaz, a Fox International Fellow at Yale University, and Alphan Telek, a PhD candidate at Science Po Paris and Boğaziçi University. The article focuses on the British Labour Party under Jeremy Corbyn and the Our Revolution movement led by US Senator Bernie Sanders, but the writers explain that the left-transformative characterization also applies to La France Insoumise, the Five Star Movement in Italy, Podemos in Spain and Syriza in Greece as well as movements emerging in Iran and Tunisia. The progressive leaders share similar goals, and progress by one lifts others by countering the notion that “the left cannot win elections in the neoliberal era.” Korkmaz and Telek conclude, “Left-transformation is a global phenomenon and can reach its ultimate aims with national and international solidarity.”  [Note: contains copyrighted material].

 [HTML format, various paging].

Economic Impact of Cybercrime – No Slowing Down

Economic Impact of Cybercrime – No Slowing Down. Center for Strategic & International Studies. James Andrew Lewis. February 21, 2018

 The Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), in partnership with McAfee, present Economic Impact of Cybercrime – No Slowing Down, a global report that focuses on the significant impact that cybercrime has on economies worldwide. The report concludes that close to $600 billion, nearly one percent of global GDP, is lost to cybercrime each year, which is up from a 2014 study that put global losses at about $445 billion. The report attributes the growth over three years to cybercriminals quickly adopting new technologies and the ease of cybercrime growing as actors leverage black markets and digital currencies. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

 [PDF format, 28 pages].

Tax and Development: New Frontiers of Research and Action

Tax and Development: New Frontiers of Research and Action. Center for Global Development. Maya Forstater. February 8, 2018.

 This paper looks at estimates of the potential gains from taxing across borders, alongside largely domestic measures such as property tax, personal income tax, VAT, and tobacco taxes. It finds that while action on cross-border taxation could yield additional tax take in the region of one percent of GDP, in many countries measures targeting the domestic tax base might deliver something in the region of nine percent. The main enabler is political commitment. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

 [PDF format, 51 pages].

Evolving Assessments of Human and Natural Contributions to Climate Change

Evolving Assessments of Human and Natural Contributions to Climate Change. Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress. Jane A. Leggett. February 1, 2018

 This CRS report provides context for the Administration’s Climate Science Special Report (October 2017) by tracing the evolution of scientific understanding and confidence regarding the drivers of recent global climate change.

 [PDF format, 25 pages].

Learning Champions: How 15 Countries, Cities, and Provinces Came Together to Rethink Learning Assessment

Learning Champions: How 15 Countries, Cities, and Provinces Came Together to Rethink Learning Assessment. Brookings Institution. Kate Anderson and Joshua Muskin. February 13, 2018

 Between 2012 and 2016, the Learning Metrics Task Force (LMTF) laid out an ambitious agenda for nations and the international community on how to define and measure learning in the context of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The first phase of the task force’s work—“LMTF 1.0”—focused on two main objectives in 2012 and 2013. One was to catalyze a shift in the global education conversation from increased education access, to access plus learning. The second was to build consensus on a set of global learning indicators and actions to improve measurement of learning worldwide.

The second phase—“LMTF 2.0”—took place between 2014 and 2016 and concentrated on applying the task force’s recommendations. This entailed influencing the SDG indicator process to include learning outcomes and developing practical strategies for countries and other jurisdictions to improve the measurement of learning across a broad range of skills.

This report describes the process undertaken by a group of 15 “Learning Champions”—countries, provinces, and cities—that came together to experiment with the LMTF 1.0 recommendations and develop strategies for improving their education systems. They did this by seeking to measure learning across the seven learning domains and seven measurement areas captured in the LMTF 1.0 recommendations. First, the authors describe these domains and measurement areas along with the structure of the Learning Champions initiative. Next, they present the experiences and activities of the 15 Learning Champions. Finally, they discuss the lessons learned from the initiative and present examples of the tools developed through it. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 60 pages].