Rethinking Coordination of Services to Refugees in Urban Areas

Rethinking Coordination of Services to Refugees in Urban Areas. RAND Corporation. Shelly Culbertson et al. April 27, 2016.

The study analyzes coordination of international and national entities managing the Syrian refugee response in urban areas in Jordan and Lebanon and provides recommendations on improving coordination strategies and practices. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 148 pages, 0.8 MB].

Education of Syrian Refugee Children

Education of Syrian Refugee Children. RAND Corporation. Shelly Culbertson and Louay Constant. November 23, 2015.

The report reviews education of Syrian refugee children in the three neighboring countries with the largest population of refugees — Turkey, Lebanon, and Jordan — and analyzes four areas: access, management, society, and quality. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 114 pages, 0.8 MB].

Jordan’s Refugee Crisis

Jordan’s Refugee Crisis. Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Alexandra Francis. September 21, 2015.

The Syrian refugee crisis has exacerbated endemic political, economic, and resource challenges in Jordan. As the conflict in Syria enters a protracted state and public discontent and other tensions rise, Jordan has limited its humanitarian response. Yet, the roots of the kingdom’s challenges run deeper than the refugee crisis and if left unaddressed will be harbingers of instability. If Jordan is to confront its national challenges and continue to provide a safe haven for Syrian refugees, the country will depend on increased international support. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

http://carnegieendowment.org/2015/09/18/jordan-s-refugee-crisis/ihwc Summary [HTML format, various paging].

http://carnegieendowment.org/files/CP_247_Francis_Jordan_final.pdf Full Text [PDF format, 46 pages, 443.55 KB].

Profiling the Islamic State

Profiling the Islamic State. Brookings Institution. Charles Lister. November 2014.

Intense turmoil in Syria and Iraq has created socio-political vacuums in which jihadi groups have been able to thrive. The Islamic State in Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) had proven to be the strongest and most dynamic of these groups, seizing large swathes of territory in Syria and Iraq. Shortly after routing Iraqi forces and conquering Mosul in June 2014, ISIS boldly announced the establishment of a caliphate and renamed itself the Islamic State (IS). How did IS become such a powerful force? What are its goals and characteristics? What are the best options for containing and defeating the group?

In a new Brookings Doha Center Analysis Paper, Charles Lister traces IS’s roots from Jordan to Afghanistan, and finally to Iraq and Syria. He describes its evolution from a small terrorist group into a bureaucratic organization that currently controls thousands of square miles and is attempting to govern millions of people. Lister assesses the group’s capabilities, explains its various tactics, and identifies its likely trajectory.

According to Lister, the key to undermining IS’s long-term sustainability is to address the socio-political failures of Syria and Iraq. Accordingly, he warns that effectively countering IS will be a long process that must be led by local actors. Specifically, Lister argues that local actors, regional states, and the international community should work to counter IS’s financial strength, neutralize its military mobility, target its leadership, and restrict its use of social media for recruitment and information operations.[Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 52 pages, 1.23 MB].