International Migration: Key Findings from the U.S., Europe and the World

International Migration: Key Findings from the U.S., Europe and the World. Pew Research Center. Phillip Connor. December 15, 2016

Millions of people have migrated from their homes to other countries in recent years. Some migrants have moved voluntarily, seeking economic opportunities. Others have been forced from their homes by political turmoil, persecution or war and have left their countries to seek asylum elsewhere.
To mark International Migrants Day last Sunday, here are Pew’s key findings about international migration trends. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

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Reducing the Risks from Rapid Demographic Change

Reducing the Risks from Rapid Demographic Change. Atlantic Council. Matthew J. Burrows. September 9, 2016.

According to the report, the West’s postwar social welfare system is under growing threat as the global demographic structure is being turned upside down. And it is not just the West, but also China and other middle-income powers who will have to deal with an aging workforce and unsustainable health and pension costs in the next decade. For sub-Saharan African countries whose birthrates remain high, overpopulation carries big costs not only for them, but for the rest of the world, which will depend on them for a growing proportion of the world’s workforce. Burrows explores how longer life expectancies, aging workforces, and high birthrates will affect the future economic growth and development of countries around the world. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

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Unwanted Migration: How Governments Cope?

Unwanted Migration: How Governments Cope? YaleGlobal. Joseph Chamie and Barry Mirkin. August 4, 2016.

Uncontrolled migration, spurred by a growing populations, fewer resources like water or arable land as well as increasing conflict, has become a contentious political issue, particularly in advanced economies like Europe and the United States, argue Chamie and Mirkin. Passions run high as liberals support assistance and an emphasis on human rights of displaced people while conservatives advocate limits and enforcement. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

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Understanding and Addressing Public Anxiety About Immigration

Understanding and Addressing Public Anxiety About Immigration. Migration Policy Institute. Demetrios G. Papademetriou and Natalia Banulescu-Bogdan. July 2016.

What factors are fueling rising public anxiety over immigration seen in Europe and North America? The report outlines and analyzes the factors that can set the stage for such public unease, some of which have their roots outside of immigration policy per se, and are instead deeply embedded in the global, national, and local contexts within which migration occurs, and offers policymakers strategies to respond. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

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Improving Education for Migrant-Background Students: A Transatlantic Comparison of School Funding

Improving Education for Migrant-Background Students: A Transatlantic Comparison of School Funding. Migration Policy Institute. Julie Sugarman et al. June 2016.

The report focuses on four countries, Canada, France, Germany, and the United States, shedding light on supplementary funding mechanisms targeted to migrant-background students, and some of the key challenges and strategies decisionmakers are wrestling with as they attempt to ensure that additional resources are used effectively. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

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Whisper It Softly: Muslims Are Part of Europe’s Future

Whisper It Softly: Muslims Are Part of Europe’s Future. YaleGlobal. Shada Islam. March 10, 2016.

Violent conflict in the Middle East is driving hundreds of thousands of refugees toward Europe, a crisis that is straining resources, explains Shada Islam. The continent is divided over welcoming the refugees and settling them in different countries, with some politicians stoking fear and warning about a clash of cultures. “Muslims, also, whatever their origin and sectarian affiliations, must get used to regarding Europe as their home, if they are to have fulfilling and productive lives,” Islam notes, pointing out that before the crisis Europe was already home to more than 40 million Muslims, many productive and active citizens. The economy will benefit from smooth integration. “The conversation must underline that living together means abiding by certain ground rules,” Islam concludes. “Integration is a two-way street, requiring adjustment efforts by migrants and host societies.” Communities can step up to the challenge and even flourish by addressing concerns with facts rather than hysterics and fear. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

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Warming World Promises More Refugees

Warming World Promises More Refugees. YaleGlobal. Richard D. Lamm. January 14, 2016.

Climate change combined with war and a growing population could pose challenges of unimaginable magnitude. “Last summer’s Mediterranean crisis, a migration of Biblical proportions from Syria to Europe, is likely merely a preview of the dislocation to come,” writes Lamm. “It is not too apocalyptic to consider the possibility that ultimately a warming world cannot support the 9 billion human beings anticipated by 2050.” Those in government and industry cannot assume a world without limits, and some, including the U.S. Pentagon and insurance analysts, already draft policies preparing for consequences of climate change. Generosity alone is not enough to handle all challenges. Excuses and surprise about new crises wear thin, and world leaders have a responsibility to anticipate and plan. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

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