How Will Retirement Saving Change by 2050? Prospects for the Millennial Generation

How Will Retirement Saving Change by 2050? Prospects for the Millennial Generation. Brookings Institution. William G. Gale, Hilary Gelfond, and Jason Fichtner. March 21, 2019

In “How Will Retirement Saving Change by 2050? Prospects for the Millennial Generation” William G. Gale, Hilary Gelfond, and Jason Fichtner consider prospects for retirement saving for members of the millennial generation, who will be between ages 54 and 69 in 2050. Adequacy of retirement saving preparation among current and near-retirees is marked by significant heterogeneity, a characteristic that will likely hold for Millennials as well. In preparing for retirement, Millennials will have several advantages relative to previous generations, such as more education, longer working lives, and more flexible work arrangements, but also several disadvantages, including having to take more responsibility for their own retirement plans and marrying and bearing children at later ages. The millennial generation contains a significantly higher percentage of minorities than previous generations. The authors find that minority households have tended to accumulate less wealth than whites in the past, even after controlling for income, education, and marital status, and the difference appears to be growing over time for black households relative to whites. Whether these trends persist is central to understanding how the Millennials will fare in retirement. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 51 pages].

How Migration of Millennials and Seniors Has Shifted since the Great Recession

How migration of millennials and seniors has shifted since the Great Recession. Brookings Institution. William H. Frey. January 31, 2019

Migration across the United States has shifted noticeably since the 2007-2009 Great Recession with many areas hoping to attract members of two huge generations: the young adult millennial generation and the increasingly graying baby boomers. Millennials, a highly educated and diverse generation now squarely in their late 20s and 30s, are forming the backbone of various regions’ emerging labor forces and consumer bases. Baby boomers, now all aged 55 and above, can reinvigorate communities that retain or attract their more affluent members. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

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