Blending Climate Funds to Finance Low-Carbon, Climate-Resilient Infrastructure

Blending Climate Funds to Finance Low-Carbon, Climate-Resilient Infrastructure. Brookings Institution. Joshua P. Meltzer.  June 20, 2018

 The world’s core infrastructure—including our transport and energy systems, buildings, industry, and land-related activities—produce more than 60 percent of all greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions globally.

By 2030 the world will need to build approximately $85 trillion in low-carbon climate-resilient (LCR) infrastructure in order to meet the Paris climate change agreement’s goal of keeping the global average temperature increase well below 2 degrees Celsius by 2050. Meeting this infrastructure investment need will require doubling today’s global capital stock. This paper defines LCR infrastructure as including renewable energy, more compact cities, and suitable mass transit as well as energy efficiency measures. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

 [PDF format, 53 pages].

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Connecting the Dots: Elements for a Joined-Up Implementation of the 2030 Agenda and Paris Agreement

Connecting the Dots: Elements for a Joined-Up Implementation of the 2030 Agenda and Paris Agreement. World Resources Institute.  Mathilde Bouyé, Sven Harmeling and Nils-Sjard Schulz.  July 2018.

 National-level implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Paris Agreement on climate change proceed on different tracks, despite growing recognition of the ample opportunities they present for synergies. In most countries, climate actions under the Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) and national targets underpinning the global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) have been defined and advanced separately. This siloed approach makes little sense given the short window of opportunity for tackling the interlinked challenges of climate change, ecosystem degradation, inequality rise, and political instability. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

 [PDF format, 89 pages].

A Milestone Moment As the Paris Agreement On Climate Change Enters Into Force

A Milestone Moment As the Paris Agreement On Climate Change Enters Into Force. Brookings Institution. Nathan Hultman. November 4, 2016

On November 4, the Paris Agreement on climate change formally entered into force. That it has happened less than a year after the conclusion of the agreement, in December 2015, is itself remarkable. The agreement enters into force with 94 Parties having ratified and 192 Parties having signed, indicating their intention to ratify soon. The agreement’s provisions are now operational, including mechanisms designed to encourage countries to implement commitments and increase ambition over time.
Now is a good time to ask what the agreement means in the overall arc of global and national climate politics and what we might expect to emerge from it in coming years. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

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