Re-Engineering Politicians: How Activist Groups Choose Our Candidates—Long Before We Vote

Re-Engineering Politicians: How Activist Groups Choose Our Candidates—Long Before We Vote. Brookings Institution. Jonathan Rauch and Raymond J. La Raja.  December  7, 2017

Political analysts sometimes refer to the process by which candidacies emerge and test their viability as the “invisible primary”: activities like candidate recruitment, training, networking, grassroots cultivation, and more. The practice has changed drastically in recent years, with far-reaching effects. This paper examines these alterations and their effects on American democracy, especially focusing on the role of independent groups in shaping the primary battlefield. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[HTML format, various paging].

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The State of the 2012 Election — Mobile Politics

The State of the 2012 Election — Mobile Politics. Pew Internet & American Life Project. Aaron Smith and Meeve Duggan. October 9, 2012.

As of late September, 88% of registered voters own a cell phone of some kind-and significant numbers of these voters are using their mobile devices to get information about the 2012 election, to interact with the campaigns, and to converse with other voters about political issues: 27% of registered voters who own a cell phone have used their phone in this election campaign to keep up with news related to the election itself or to political issues in general. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 8 pages, 757.06 KB].

Politics on Social Networking Sites

Politics on Social Networking Sites. Lee Rainie and Aaron Smith. Pew Internet & American Life Project. September 4, 2012.

Campaign and policy-related material on social networking sites plays a modest role in influencing most users’ views and political activities. Democrats and liberals are the most likely to say the sites have impact and are important and the politically engaged stand out in their use of the sites. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 22 pages, 876.38 KB].

How the Presidential Candidates Use the Web and Social Media: Obama Leads but Neither Candidate Engages in Much Dialogue with Voters

How the Presidential Candidates Use the Web and Social Media: Obama Leads but Neither Candidate Engages in Much Dialogue with Voters. Pew Project for Excellence in Jouralism. August 15, 2012.

On the eve of the conventions, Barack Obama holds a distinct advantage over Mitt Romney in the way his campaign is using digital technology to communicate directly with voters. The Obama campaign is posting almost four times as much content and is active on nearly twice as many platforms, according to the study. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 33 pages, 1.55 MB].