Parents’ Access to Work-Family Supports

Parents’ Access to Work-Family Supports. Urban Institute. Shirley Adelstein, H. Elizabeth Peters. October 11, 2019

Three work-family supports—paid leave, workplace flexibility and control, and support for child care—are crucial to the ability of parents to effectively manage work and family. This research used national survey data to examine patterns in working parents’ access to these supports; variations in access by parental characteristics like socioeconomic advantage; and the need for these work-family supports among working parents.Three work-family supports—paid leave, workplace flexibility and control, and support for child care—are crucial to the ability of parents to effectively manage work and family. This research used national survey data to examine patterns in working parents’ access to these supports; variations in access by parental characteristics like socioeconomic advantage; and the need for these work-family supports among working parents. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 43 pages].

Community Oriented Nonprofits and Neighborhood Poverty

Community Oriented Nonprofits and Neighborhood Poverty. Urban Institute. Christopher R. Hayes et al. September 14, 2015.

The study examines the spatial pattern of community-oriented nonprofit organizations in the 100 largest metropolitan areas. It finds that: (1) the densities of these nonprofits typically increase with neighborhood poverty rates; (2) they are much more prevalent in metros in the northeast, mid-west and along the pacific coast, than in the sunbelt; and (3) their numbers have been growing rapidly everywhere, particularly so in places where their densities were lower in the past. The authors conclude that the findings warrant further research on how variations in the density and mix of nonprofits in a neighborhood may influence neighborhood improvement. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[HTML format, 32 pages].

Reducing Child Poverty in the US: Costs and Impacts of Policies Proposed by the Children’s Defense Fund

Reducing Child Poverty in the US: Costs and Impacts of Policies Proposed by the Children’s Defense Fund. Urban Institute. Linda Giannarelli et al. January 30, 2015.

The report estimates how much child poverty could be reduced by a comprehensive set of policies, increasing the minimum wage, providing transitional jobs, expanding subsidized housing and child care, increasing food assistance, increasing federal income tax credits, and changing how child support is counted in determining benefits. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 168 pages, 2.11 MB].