Aligning Partnerships for Security: A Human Rights-Based Approach to Security and Economic Cooperation

Aligning Partnerships for Security: A Human Rights-Based Approach to Security and Economic Cooperation. Center for Strategic & International Studies. Shannon N. Green, Julie N. Snyder. February 23, 2017

Human rights are often compromised and relegated to a lower status than security or economic interests. Furthermore, a lack of collaboration and communication between U.S. government agencies, the private sector, and civil society prevents a more coherent and effective approach to human rights. This report examines concrete ways in which the U.S. government, particularly the military, private sector, and civil society, can work individually and in concert to reduce human rights violations committed by partner security forces. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 24 pages, 2.80 MB].

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Countering Violent Extremism in the United States

Countering Violent Extremism in the United States. Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress. Jerome P. Bjelopera. May 31, 2012.

In August 2011, the Obama Administration announced its counter-radicalization strategy. It is devised to address the forces that influence some people living in the U.S. to acquire and hold radical or extremist beliefs that may eventually compel them to commit terrorism. This is the first such strategy for the federal government, which calls this effort “combating violent extremism” (CVE). The strategy addresses the radicalization of all types of potential terrorists in the U.S. but focuses on those inspired by Al Qaeda. To further elaborate this strategy, in December 2011 the Administration released its “Strategic Implementation Plan for Empowering Local Partners to Prevent Violent Extremism in the United States” (SIP). The report provides examples of recent Administration CVE activity and examines some of the risks and challenges evident in the SIP’s three objectives.

[PDF format, 33 pages, 672.01 KB].

Department of Defense Energy Initiatives: Background and Issues for Congress.

Department of Defense Energy Initiatives: Background and Issues for Congress. Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress. Moshe Schwartz et al. June 5, 2012.

The Department of Defense (DOD) spends billions of dollars per year on fuel, and is pursuing numerous initiatives for reducing its fuel needs and changing the mix of energy sources that it uses. DOD’s energy initiatives pose several potential oversight issues for Congress, and have been topics of discussion and debate at hearings on DOD’s proposed FY2013 budget

[PDF format, 59 pages, 834.38 KB].

The National Nanotechnology Initiative: Overview, Reauthorization, and Appropriations Issues

The National Nanotechnology Initiative: Overview, Reauthorization, and Appropriations Issues. Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress. John F. Sargent, Jr. May 22, 2012.

Nanotechnology–a term encompassing the science, engineering, and applications of submicron materials–involves the harnessing of unique physical, chemical, and biological properties of nanoscale substances in fundamentally new and useful ways. The economic and societal promise of nanotechnology has led to substantial and sustained investments by governments and companies around the world. In 2000, the U.S. launched the world’s first national nanotechnology program. From FY2001 through FY2012, the federal government invested approximately $15.6 billion in nanoscale science, engineering, and technology through the U.S. National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI). President Obama has requested $1.8 billion in NNI funding for FY2013. U.S. companies and state governments have invested billions more. As a result of this focus and these investments, the U.S. has, in the view of many experts, emerged as a global leader in nanotechnology. However, the competition for global leadership in nanotechnology is intensifying as countries and companies around the world increase their investments.

[PDF format, 60 pages, 646.70 KB].