Helping Kids and Families Cope With Violence: Safe Start Promising Approaches

Helping Kids and Families Cope With Violence: Safe Start Promising Approaches. RAND Corporation. Dana Schultz et al. March 30, 2017.

Although rates of children’s exposure to violence have been declining in the United States, the problem remains extensive. The most recent study found that more than half of children in a national sample had been exposed to violence in the past year. Children who have been abused or witnessed violence are more likely than other children to develop mental health problems and engage in risky behaviors. Some of these problems can persist into adulthood. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 4 pages, 88.27 KB].

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Engaging Communities in Reducing Gun Violence: A Road Map for Safer Communities

Engaging Communities in Reducing Gun Violence: A Road Map for Safer Communities. Urban Institute. Samuel Bieler et al. April 28, 2016.

Gun violence inflicts a devastating toll on communities of color, but the justice system response to this violence frequently destabilizes neighborhoods and damages police-community relations. The report shows that violence prevention demands a holistic set of solutions. Limiting access to firearms is part of the solution, but a comprehensive strategy will also require improving police-community relations, investing in community services, and facilitating community leadership in violence prevention efforts. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 67 pages, 947.6 KB].

In Syrian War, Peace, Politics and Possibilities Are a Local Affair

In Syrian War, Peace, Politics and Possibilities Are a Local Affair. U.S. Institute of Peace. Osama Gharizi. October 2015.

While the mass bloodshed of Syria’s civil war so far has spared many Kurdish and Arab farming villages in Syria’s far northeast, the war has exacerbated communal tensions there. So recently, 14 religious, tribal and civic leaders from one locality traveled to neighboring Iraq for talks to ease those tensions and prevent an outbreak of violence. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

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Hamas Seen as More to Blame Than Israel for Current Violence: Deep Partisan Divide in Reactions to Mideast Fighting

Hamas Seen as More to Blame Than Israel for Current Violence: Deep Partisan Divide in Reactions to Mideast Fighting. Pew Research Center for the People & the Press. July 28, 2014.

As fighting continues to rage in Gaza amid calls for a cease-fire, about twice as many Americans say Hamas (40%) as Israel (19%) is responsible for the current violence. Just a quarter (25%) believe that Israel has gone too far in responding to the conflict; far more think Israel’s response has been about right (35%) or that it has not gone far enough (15%). The survey, conducted July 24-27 among 1,005 adults, finds substantial partisan divisions over which side is most responsible for the violence and Israel’s response to the conflict. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 16 pages, 735.54 KB].

Most Think the U.S. Has No Responsibility To Act in Iraq

Most Think the U.S. Has No Responsibility To Act in Iraq. Pew Research Center for the People & the Press. July 18, 2014.

As violence and chaos spreads in Iraq, the public is wary of U.S. involvement in the country. A 55% majority says the United States does not have a responsibility to do something about the violence in Iraq; 39% do see a responsibility to act. Overall public awareness of the situation in Iraq is high: 45% say they have heard a lot about the violence in Iraq and takeover of large parts of the country by the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS). [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 14 pages, 419.67 KB].

Gaza and Israel: New Obstacles, New Solutions

Gaza and Israel: New Obstacles, New Solutions. International Crisis Group. July 14, 2104.

To break the violent impasse, Israel must change its policy toward Hamas and work toward a lasting ceasefire, recognising how much its own stability depends on the stability of Gaza, says to the report. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 12 pages, 1.33 MB].

The Other Side of Gender: Men as Critical Agents of Change

The Other Side of Gender: Men as Critical Agents of Change. U.S. Institute of Peace. Joseph Vess et al. December 12, 2013.

Better understanding of how experiences in war change men’s roles and identities can lead to better interventions to help men deal with the trauma of war violence, to combat gender-based violence, and equip men as agents of peace in their postconflict communities. Based on their review of existing work to help men in postconflict settings, five leading experts recommend a multipronged approach to expand programming and conduct rigorous evaluation to determine which programs are most effective. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 12 pages, 131.46 KB].