Meet the Millions Of Young Adults Who Are Out Of Work

Meet the Millions Of Young Adults Who Are Out Of Work. Brookings Institution. Martha Ross and Natalie Holmes. April 9, 2019

Helping young people prepare to engage in work and life as productive adults is a central challenge for any society. In theory, the path to employment providing financial security in adulthood is simple: finish high school, enroll in and complete college or training that is affordable and a good fit, gain some work experience along the way, and launch a career. But given that 17 percent of young adults ages 18 to 24 are out of work in mid to large cities in the U.S., totaling 2.3 million young people, this path does not appear to work equally well for all, particularly in light of the effects of the Great Recession and the declining rates of employment among teens and young adults since about 2000. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 36 pages].

Infographic, methods and data sources, and data appendix can be downloaded here – https://www.brookings.edu/research/young-adults-who-are-out-of-work/

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Pathways to High-Quality Jobs for Young Adults

Pathways to High-Quality Jobs for Young Adults. Brookings Institution. Martha Ross et al. October, 2018

Helping young people prepare to engage in work and life as productive adults is a central challenge for any society. Yet, many young people in the United States—particularly those from low-income or less educated families—find that the path to employment and economic security in adulthood is poorly marked or inaccessible.

Using an advanced methodology and longitudinal data, this report examines two main questions:

  • The quality of jobs (as measured by wages, benefits, hours, and job satisfaction) held by 29-year-olds who experienced disadvantage in adolescence
  • Whether particular employment, education, and training experiences in adolescence and early adulthood predict higher-quality jobs for 29-year-olds from disadvantaged backgrounds.

[Note: contains copyrighted material].

 [PDF format, 56 pages].

Reforming the U.S. Youth Minimum Wage

Reforming the U.S. Youth Minimum Wage. Manhattan Institute for Policy Research. Preston Cooper. August 9, 2016.

According to the author, unemployment among U.S. teenagers now stands at 16 percent. Raising the minimum wage, as many are advocating, will only make the situation worse. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 24 pages, 1.15 MB].

Teens, Technology and Friendships

Teens, Technology and Friendships. Pew Research Center. Amanda Lenhart. August 6, 2015.

For American teens, making friends isn’t just confined to the school yard, playing field or neighborhood – many are making new friends online. Fully 57% of teens ages 13 to 17 have made a new friend online, with 29% of teens indicating that they have made more than five new friends in online venues. Most of these friendships stay in the digital space; only 20% of all teens have met an online friend in person. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 76 pages, 1.38 MB].