Arts-Based Approaches to Public Engagement with Research: Lessons from a Rapid Review

Arts-Based Approaches to Public Engagement with Research: Lessons from a Rapid Review.  RAND Corporation. Sarah Ballet al. January 12, 2021.

There is growing interest in the use of approaches to public engagement with research that use the arts to facilitate engagement. However, there is a lack of systematic and consolidated learning about how arts-based approaches work in practice and about their effectiveness. To help respond to this gap in the knowledge base, The Healthcare Improvement Studies (THIS) Institute at Cambridge University commissioned RAND Europe to conduct a rapid review of the evidence on the use and effectiveness of arts-based approaches for public engagement with research. The findings of this report are based on a literature review that followed the principles of a rapid evidence assessment, complemented by interviews with six experts in the field of arts-based public engagement. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 111 pages].

A New Green Learning Agenda: Approaches to Quality Education for Climate Action

A New Green Learning Agenda: Approaches to Quality Education for Climate Action. Brookings Institution.  Christina Kwauk and Olivia Casey, January 6, 2021

As countries work to “build back better” from COVID-19, the education sector has a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to build back differently. Unprecedented school disruptions have laid bare how existing inequalities within our education systems, including those structured along the intersections of gender and poverty, are exacerbated in times of crisis. Yet COVID-19 school disruptions are only a sample of what is to come as extreme weather events and zoonotic disease transfer become a more regular occurrence in the context of ecological collapse and climate breakdown.  [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 103 pages].

Bank Supervision by Federal Regulators: Overview and Policy Issues

Bank Supervision by Federal Regulators: Overview and Policy Issues. Congressional Research Service. David W. Perkins. December 28, 2020

To identify and mitigate risks, bank regulators have the authority to monitor bank activities, condition, and performance. Bank supervision creates certain benefits, including safer banks, a more stable financial system, compliance with consumer protection and fair lending laws, and safeguards against money laundering and cyberattacks. However, it imposes certain costs on banks, including the fees they pay to their supervisors and compliance costs, which can reduce credit availability through the banking system.

All banks are supervised by a primary federal prudential regulator for “safety and soundness,” which is determined by a bank’s charter type and whether the bank is a member of the Federal Reserve System. The federal prudential regulators are the Federal Reserve (Fed), the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC), and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). Banks are also supervised for compliance with consumer protection and fair lending laws. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) is generally the primary supervisor for consumer compliance for banks with more than $10 billion, and the bank’s prudential supervisor is also the consumer compliance supervisor for banks with less than $10 billion. Banks chartered at the state level are also supervised by state-level bank regulatory agencies. Parent companies that own banks, called bank-holding companies, are supervised by the Federal Reserve. In addition, companies that perform certain activities for banks by contract are also subject to bank regulator supervision.

[PDF format, 29 pages].

Employers, Young People, and Training and Support: Implementation Study of the Urban Alliance High School Internship Program

Employers, Young People, and Training and Support: Implementation Study of the Urban Alliance High School Internship Program. Urban Institute. Brett Theodos et al. January 12, 2021

In this report, we present baseline and process study findings of an evaluation of the Urban Alliance High School Internship Program, which provides professional internships, mentorship and coaching, college and career skills training to high school seniors. The report focuses on the program’s operations in Washington, DC, Baltimore, Chicago, and Northern Virginia. It explains the program model and its components, describes the characteristics of participating young people and their schools and neighborhoods, discusses program implementation, quantifies attrition in the program, describes Urban Alliance’s plans for growth and change, and provides recommendations for further consideration as the program continues to evolve. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 115 pages].

COVID-19 and the Experiences of Populations at Greater Risk: Description and Top-Line Summary Data — Wave 2, Fall 2020

COVID-19 and the Experiences of Populations at Greater Risk: Description and Top-Line Summary Data — Wave 2, Fall 2020. RAND Corporation. Katherine Grace Carman et al. January 13, 2021.

As a continuation of RAND Corporation and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation efforts to capture how people in the United States think about, value, and prioritize issues of health, well-being, and health equity, a longitudinal survey is being deployed to aid in understanding how health views and values have been affected by the experience of the COVID-19 pandemic. In this report, the authors present the results of the second of four waves of the COVID-19 and the Experiences of Populations at Greater Risk Survey, fielded during fall 2020, with particular focus on populations deemed at risk or underserved, including people of color and those from low- to moderate-income backgrounds.

The questions in this COVID-19 survey focused specifically on experiences related to the pandemic (e.g., financial, physical, emotional), how respondents viewed the disproportionate impacts of the pandemic, whether and how respondents’ views and priorities regarding health actions and investments are changing (including the role of government and the private sector), and how general values about such issues as freedom and racism may be related to pandemic views and response expectations.

The authors summarize detailed top-line results for each of the questions included in the survey and sociodemographic characteristics of the sample. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 53 pages].

Mapping Green Innovation Ecosystems: Evaluating the Success Factors for the World’s Leading Greentech-Innovation Centers

Mapping Green Innovation Ecosystems: Evaluating the Success Factors for the World’s Leading Greentech-Innovation Centers. Atlantic Council.  Peter Engelke, Margaret Jackson, Randolph Bell. January 18, 2021      

Enabling current and future generations to mitigate climate change requires the urgent creation and scaling up of technologies that minimize and reverse the impact of human activities on the environment. The ecosystems that foster innovation in green technologies, and the success factors that enable these ecosystems, must be better understood in order to replicate them around the world.

This new Global Energy Center issue brief assesses the value of greentech-innovation ecosystems. It identifies commonalities between the places and companies that attract investment as they lead the world to a greener, low-carbon economy. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 20 pages].

News Use Across Social Media Platforms in 2020: Facebook Stands Out as a Regular Source of News for About a Third of Americans

News Use Across Social Media Platforms in 2020: Facebook Stands Out as a Regular Source of News for About a Third of Americans. Pew Research Center.  Elisa Shearer, Amy Mitchell. January 12, 2021.

As social media companies struggle to deal with misleading information on their platforms about the election, the COVID-19 pandemic and more, a large portion of Americans continue to rely on these sites for news. About half of U.S. adults (53%) say they get news from social media “often” or “sometimes,” and this use is spread out across a number of different sites, according to a Pew Research Center survey conducted Aug. 31-Sept. 7, 2020. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 18 pages].

Youth Engagement in Collective Impact Initiatives: Lessons from Promise Neighborhoods

Youth Engagement in Collective Impact Initiatives: Lessons from Promise Neighborhoods. Urban Institute. Jessica Shakesprere, Mica O’Brien, Eona Harrison. December 21, 2020

Youth engagement is the meaningful and sustained involvement of young people in efforts to create positive social change. This approach requires youth-serving organizations to rebalance traditional power dynamics between adults and young people, allowing youths to take on decisionmaking responsibilities. Collective impact initiatives such as Promise Neighborhoods are well-positioned to meaningfully incorporate youth input and leadership in program design, implementation, and evaluation. Promise Neighborhoods in West Philadelphia, Southeast Alaska, and Knox County, Kentucky, are doing just that, engaging young people through school- and community-based initiatives. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 15 pages].

Regulating Contaminants Under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA)

Regulating Contaminants Under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). Congressional Research Service. Elena H. Humphreys. January 8, 2021.

Concerns about drinking water quality have resulted in congressional attention to the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), particularly on the process for evaluating contaminants for potential regulation. Detections of unregulated contaminants in public water supplies in numerous states have raised concerns about the quality of drinking water and increased congressional interest to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) response to such detections. Additionally, concerns about the detection of regulated contaminants, such as lead, have raised concerns about the effectiveness of certain existing regulations.

SDWA is the key federal law that authorizes EPA to promulgate regulations to control contaminants in public water supplies. Since enactment of the act in 1974, EPA has issued drinking water regulations for over 90 contaminants. Congress has twice revised the act’s process for evaluating contaminants and developing drinking water regulations (in 1986 and 1996). In 1986, Congress directed EPA to develop regulations for 83 contaminants within 3 years, and adopt regulations, every 3 years, for at least 25 new contaminants. When this regulatory schedule proved unworkable, Congress amended SDWA in 1996 to establish a risk-based process that prioritizes contaminants for regulation based on the contaminant’s health effects and occurrence.

[PDF format, 32 pages].

The Land of In-Between: Revitalizing America’s Small and Mid-Sized Cities

The Land of In-Between: Revitalizing America’s Small and Mid-Sized Cities. Center for Strategic & International Studies. William Alan Reinsch et al. December 16, 2020

After decades of slow urban decay, U.S. cities are experiencing a renaissance. New development and investment are rapidly changing the face of our nation’s urban areas. Before the Covid-19 pandemic, the U.S. economy was experiencing its longest period of growth in history and its lowest unemployment rate in nearly half a century. But such prosperity was not equally dispersed across the nation, with some regions reaping more of the benefits of this expansion. This report focuses on smaller metro regions in the U.S., fundamental to our national economy and where the plurality of citizens lives. Although these small and mid-sized communities have recently experienced decline and stagnation, many regions are now seen as new lands of opportunity for people fleeing the high cost of living and stress of big city living. CSIS research centers on two case studies to analyze what policies and actions governments and local stakeholders are implementing to encourage renewal and growth. [Note: contains copyrighted material].

[PDF format, 56 pages].